Call for workspaces

Opening Reproducible Research with OJS

Data and software are crucial components of research. They go well beyond the workflows one would call Data Science today. Only openly available building blocks can ensure transparency, reproducibility, and reusability of computer-based research outputs. More and more researchers rely on small or large datasets and use analysis tools to analyse variables, create figures, and derive conclusions. That is why the project Opening Reproducible Research (o2r) implements the concept of the Executable Research Compendium (ERC) to capture all bits and pieces underlying a research article. In a pilot study, we plan to connect the Open Journal Systems (OJS) with the ERC. On the one hand this connection enables submission, review, and publishing of research compendia and ERC. On the other hand while it leverages the publishing capabilities and workflow management of OJS. We will implement this integration in form of an OJS plug-in so it becomes readily available for all maintainers of OJS instances

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Markus Konkol defends PhD Thesis

Markus Konkol successfully defended his PhD thesis, “Publishing Reproducible Geoscientific Papers: Status quo, benefits, and opportunities”, today Friday Oct 11 at the Institute for Geoinformatics (ifgi) at University of Münster (WWU).

🎉 Congratulations Markus on completing this important step in your career! 🥂

Dr. rer. nat. Markus Konkol is pictured with his Mentor Prof. Dr. Christian Kray and the examination committee: Jun. Prof. Dr. Judith Verstegen, Prof. Dr. Edzer Pebesma, Prof. Dr. Carsten Kessler and Prof. Dr. Harald Strauß.

Markus Konkol successfully defended his PhD thesis; examination committee

Markus has been a core o2r team member since the project’s start in January 2016. He lead

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o2r on tour: eLife Sprint and JupyterHub/Binder workshop

This week, the o2r team was on tour. We put our o2r tasks aside for a few days to interact with and contribute to the awesome Open Science/publishing/research community.

Markus and Daniel were two of the fortunate few who

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Why PDFs are not suitable for communicating (geo)scientific results

In 2016, Dottori et al. published a paper about a flood damage model. The model calculates the damage costs caused by a flood event, e.g., for repairing buildings or cleaning. This model is based on a number of parameters, such as flow velocity and flood duration. In the paper, the authors discuss a scenario in which a flood has a velocity of 2m/s and a duration of 24 hours. The resulting damage costs are shown in a figure and also alternative values are discussed in the text. This is where the paper format, i.e. a PDF file, is limited. A mere format change does not help - a static HTML rendering has the same issues. Describing within the article text how changes to the parameter set affect the damage costs might be possible possible but is surely a daunting and time-consuming task. Authors need to find the right words to briefly describe these changes, and readers need to imagine how the results change

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4+1 quick incentives of open reproducible research

A few months ago, o2r team member Markus published the article “In-depth examination of spatiotemporal figures in open reproducible research” in the journal Cartography and Geographic Information science. Our goal was to identify a set of concrete incentives for authors to publish open reproducible research, and for readers to engage with it. Based on semi-structured interviews, a focus group discussion, and an online survey with geoscientists, we summarised the incentives in a four-step workflow for readers who work with scientific papers (see figure below). Let’s see what these four workflow steps are who their +1 is

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Except where otherwise noted site content created by the o2r project is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Cite this blog post or page as "Home" (2019) in Opening Reproducible Research: a research project website and blog. Daniel Nüst, Marc Schutzeichel, Markus Konkol (eds). Zenodo. doi:10.5281/zenodo.1485437